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This guest post was contributed by Andrew Muller (@TheRealMusician) goes to all his concerts in Vancouver & Seattle, because small-town Chilliwack (where he lives) has some of the least diverse music tastes this side of Utah. You can find him writing about personal development for musicians on his website, therealmusician.com. He also runs Twitter campaigns for musicians who need a little boost in their marketing.

While working on promoting band’s Twitter accounts, I’ve started to notice a fairly consistent trend between campaigns that are extremely effective, and campaigns that just do “alright”.

The trends I’ve noticed sometimes have to do with the style of a band’s music, but more often than not it just has to do with simple changes to a band’s Twitter account.

Here’s how you can tip the scales in your favour, and increase the chances that anyone viewing your Twitter account will decide to follow you.

Custom background/header/profile image (with photoshop templates)

I can’t tell you how often a band is ready to run a promotional campaign on Twitter, but hasn’t even bothered to create custom graphics for their Twitter page yet. It’s a very simple task, so it always tends to blow me away when I see this.

If you don’t have any of your own ideas, here are some I’ll give you to get you started. If you do have your own ideas, feel free to let those surpass my recommendations.

For your profile photo, I would recommend choosing a picture of your band. Sometimes an album cover or a piece of art you have can be appropriate too. The photo can be up to 2mb in size.

For your header image, create a graphic that’s 1252×626 in size. It can be an album cover, a picture of your band, or maybe even just a background from your album slip. Do your best to make it a cohesive image that fits in with the rest of your band image.

For your main background, I have a special treat for you. Take a look at the Twitter account for “Every Time I Die”. Their background image is a perfect example of professional design, and you can achieve a very similar effect with minimal graphic design skills.

If you follow this link, you can download a photoshop file I’ve prepared for you.

All you need to do is fill in the blanks to get a professional background image. You do need to own a copy of photoshop, or at least know someone who does, but it should save you a lot of legwork when designing your own Twitter background.

With those 3 elements in place, you should be good to go as far as the “look and feel” of your Twitter page goes.

Tweet @ people

Twitter is meant to be a dialogue between you and your fans, so you need to consistently be talking to people.

Using the @ symbol when you reference someone is a great way to show on your public Twitter profile that you’re talking with people. When someone shows up to your Twitter page and sees that you are actively talking with people, they’re much more likely to follow you.

Tweet consistently

With that last point in mind, just Tweeting (similar to a Facebook status update) is something you should practice regularly. 3 times a day is an optimal amount, but if you haven’t even started yet and you don’t feel like you can commit to that number, start with a number you can handle.

Maybe you can only handle once a week, or once a day. Start there, and as you get more familiar with Twitter, you can Tweet more. You really do want to reach that sweet spot of 3 times a day though, so keep that in mind.

Still, once a week is far better than nothing.

Don’t over-promote (more original tweets)

When Tweeting, remember that you don’t always want to be promoting your new album, track, or a show you’re playing. Those are all relevant things that should show up on your Twitter feed periodically, but realistically you want to be posting a large amount of things that you like, and just sharing your mind.

As a good rule of thumb, only 10% of your posts should be self promotion; everything else should be something that your fans would simply find interesting (and don’t require them to buy something).

With all these tips implemented on your Twitter account, you should start to see more people reacting positively when they see your profile, and will help to increase your follow rate.

What changes did you decide to implement?

Where did you find that you had a deficit in your Twitter presence? Did you already have all of this done before you read this article? Tell us below!

Category: Blog, Sound Advice

  • Dillio

    I’ve been using the techniques I’ve learned from from your book , how ever I still struggle to figure out what to tweet about thats not related to my music so I don’t tweet much at all.

  • Lisa Tagaloa

    Whew, I’m pretty much doing that stuff for my band already :) The only thing I don’t have is my band name on the side of the twitter page, but I kinda like that it’s not there.

  • Andy O.

    For those with deskjobs, there are a couple of Google Chrome plugins that make tweeting super easy. Silverbird is one I think, and then there’s another that I think is just Twitter for Chrome. Lifesavers for me and my group.